Roots of the painter Jean-Philippe Fortin

A few times, during the opening of the exhibition Roots, traditional lighting has given way to UV light. Jean-Philippe Fortin’s brightly colored paintings have been quite transformed, sometimes appearing more playful or more dramatic with their many fluorescent accents.

People discover the works illuminated by ultraviolet light at the opening of Jean-Philippe Fortin’s first solo exhibition.

Photo: courtesy: Betula

Jean-Philippe Fortin loves this kind of surprises. Moreover, his paintings of recent years have also been designed to reveal 3D effects. The artist very often paints while wearing 3D glasses. This allows him to see and foresee in part, what he wants to show.

It’s a wonderful experience to be able to enter into a work. It makes us discover another facet of art and the canvas. It’s important to bring something to life for collectors or children so that they understand that there is something else going on. It’s not just physical. It just isn’t straight. One can enter the work of art and manage to understand a little further what the artist meanthe explains.

The portrait of an androgynous character.

A work by Jean-Philippe Fortin, entitled “Androgyne”.

Photo: Radio-Canada / Valérie Cloutier

Androgyne], on ne voit pas vraiment si elle représente un homme ou une femme. Donc, sa porte à discussion. Chez un collectionneur, ce qui est intéressant, c’est qu’on va voir cette œuvre-là de différentes façons. Avec les lunettes3D, avec la lumière UV, et surtout, on va avoir une discussion autour de l’œuvre. Moi, j’ai une interprétation. Mais je veux que vous ayez la vôtre! C’est ça qui est important.”,”text”:”En tant qu’artiste, on a un travail de figer un peu l’époque où on est, et d’écrire un peu ça. Et c’est ce que j’essaie de faire avec les œuvres. Cette œuvre-ci [voir, ci-haut, la photographie de l’œuvre intitulée Androgyne], on ne voit pas vraiment si elle représente un homme ou une femme. Donc, sa porte à discussion. Chez un collectionneur, ce qui est intéressant, c’est qu’on va voir cette œuvre-là de différentes façons. Avec les lunettes3D, avec la lumière UV, et surtout, on va avoir une discussion autour de l’œuvre. Moi, j’ai une interprétation. Mais je veux que vous ayez la vôtre! C’est ça qui est important.”}}”>As an artist, we have a job to freeze a bit the era we are in, and to write a little about that. And that’s what I try to do with the works. This work [voir, ci-haut, la photographie de l’œuvre intitulée Androgyne], we do not really see if it represents a man or a woman. So its door to discussion. With a collector, what is interesting is that we will see this work in different ways. With 3D glasses, with UV light, and above all, we’re going to have a discussion around the work. I have an interpretation. But I want you to have yours! That’s what’s important.

A character looking at a cell phone.

A painting by Jean-Philippe Fortin, titled “The Failure”.

Photo: Radio-Canada / Valérie Cloutier

In his studio in Quebec, which he covered with plastic sheeting from floor to ceiling, we see that the paint has flown in all directions.

This is my artistic environment. It was a laboratory for several years. A laboratory with which I learned to play with materials, to understand materials with the reflection of light, textures… Because each work has this particularity of having a lot of textures and little surprises in the canvasesexplains the painter.

It must be said that very early in childhood, Fortin felt challenged by the technique of dripping by discovering the American artist, Jackson Pollock.

ans, je savais déjà où je voulais aller”,”text”:”Je peins avec beaucoup de gestes. Et veut, veut pas, ça explose un peu partout. J’ai été élevé dans cet art-là parce que mon père est un artiste peintre, aussi un sculpteur, qui m’a fait connaître plein d’artistes à travers la vie. Mais, il m’a fait connaître surtout Jackson Pollock qui pour moi a été marquant. À partir de l’âge de 14ans, je savais déjà où je voulais aller”}}”>I paint with a lot of gestures. And want, don’t want, it explodes everywhere. I was brought up in this art because my father is a painter, also a sculptor, who introduced me to many artists through life. But he made me know especially Jackson Pollock which for me was significant. From the age of 14, I already knew where I wanted to gohe recalls.

He, who hung up his brushes very young, then worked in various professions in the restaurant industry in addition to starting three digital businesses before rediscovering, at the age of 36, the taste for painting.

Because it was stronger! It was a fire that I had in me. And I needed to express that art.

3D glasses.

Jean-Philippe Fortin encourages people to look at his works with 3D glasses to discover his paintings in another light.

Photo: Radio-Canada / Valérie Cloutier

Jean-Philippe Fortin likes the idea of ​​allowing people to experience in person the 3D effects that appear when looking at his paintings with glasses provided for this purpose. It is an experience that unfortunately cannot be captured in a photograph.

15 à 30secondes avant de comprendre ce qui se passe, et après ça, on rentre dans l’univers de la toile. C’est tout simplement une illusion qu’on va avoir entre le 3D et notre cerveau qui devient un peu hystérique avec les couleurs, et ça nous permet de rentrer dans cette toile-là. J’adore créer avec ça parce que ça me permet justement de juxtaposer ces couleurs-là […] C’est un univers de fou, c’est de la chimie de couleurs”,”text”:”L’œil humain prend entre15 à 30secondes avant de comprendre ce qui se passe, et après ça, on rentre dans l’univers de la toile. C’est tout simplement une illusion qu’on va avoir entre le 3D et notre cerveau qui devient un peu hystérique avec les couleurs, et ça nous permet de rentrer dans cette toile-là. J’adore créer avec ça parce que ça me permet justement de juxtaposer ces couleurs-là […] C’est un univers de fou, c’est de la chimie de couleurs”}}”>The human eye takes between 15 to 30 seconds to understand what is happening, and after that, we enter the universe of the canvas. It’s quite simply an illusion that we’re going to have between 3D and our brain which becomes a little hysterical with colors, and that allows us to get into this canvas. I love creating with it because it allows me to juxtapose these colors […] It’s a crazy universe, it’s color chemistry.

A canvas that represents a curled up man.  A hand touches him on the back.

A work where appears the imprint of a hand of the father of Jean-Philippe Fortin.

Photo: Radio-Canada / Valérie Cloutier

See things from different angles. This is one of the central ideas of Jean-Philippe Fortin’s approach. And leave traces too. Thus, for example, the prints of his hands appear subtly in some of his paintings. And even the imprint of his father’s hand was found at the heart of a painting made on the spot a few hours after his death. We are not surprised when the artist explains the many reasons that prompted him to choose the title Rootsfor his first solo exhibition.

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