The slow disappearance of the middle class in Venezuela, Carmignac Photography Prize

Venezuelan photographer Fabiola Ferrero received the Carmignac prize for photojournalism at the “Visa pour l’image” festival, which runs until September 11 in Perpignan, for her work on the economic collapse of her country and the slow disappearance of middle class.

“All my work, over the past five years in Venezuela, has had a very nostalgic tone, of mourning, for having lost not only loved ones, because they had to leave the country, but also for the loss of the most more fundamental: the normality that we knew,” she told AFP in a telephone interview.

About 60 images make up the project, the fruit of five years of work, including six months financed by the Carmignac prize, endowed with 50,000 euros. Some of this work will be exhibited in October in Paris, she announced.

Fabiola Ferrero, 30, shows in her series the dilapidation of emblematic places in Venezuela, such as the housing estates built for decades by the state oil company PDVSA, when its thousands of workers worked for the country’s key development sector.

More than five million Venezuelans have since had to leave their country because of the economic and social crisis. Once one of the wealthiest in Latin America, the country now needs humanitarian aid which the UN began distributing in 2019.

“Beyond the middle class, I would say I’m talking about traces of a promise that was made to us. Throughout my childhood, we were told over and over again that it was the country of oil, where everything was possible”, recalls the photographer, collaborator of international media such as Time or National Geographic and already winner of the Inge Morath photography prize. , awarded by the Magnum agency.

“It is very simplistic to blame a single factor. It is often attributed to the arrival of Hugo Chavez, ”the former Venezuelan president (1999-2013), she continues. “But if a single person was able to destroy all these institutions over the years, it means that these institutions were not very solid at the start”, she nuances.

Inequalities have widened further in recent years, against the backdrop of the pandemic and political tensions. Social inequalities “are deeper than during my childhood,” says Fabiola Ferrero.

Source: AFP

Venezuelan photographer Fabiola Ferrero received the Carmignac prize for photojournalism at the “Visa pour l’image” festival, which runs until September 11 in Perpignan, for her work on the economic collapse of her country and the slow disappearance of middle class. “All my work, over the past five years in Venezuela, has had a very…

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